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First officially observed in 2006, June is Caribbean American Heritage Month and we are very excited to include those from the Caribbean Islands, now living in the United states as part of our monthly celebration! This group, considered part of the Pan-African community, have contributed to our society since its very origins, as the first groups of enslaved individuals brought over from the continent of Africa during chattel slavery, were brought to the Caribbean islands. The history of brave individuals fighting back against their oppressors never ceased and that spirit continues to this day with a vast array of activism, politics, art, music, sports, ...
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Did you know that June is Men’s Health Month? When we think about Men’s Health, the topic typically lands on exercise, heart or sexual health. While those are very important issues in themselves, we should not overlook the often stigmatized mental health of the men in our nation. Although Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias are not always included in Behavioral Health categories, even within healthcare facilities, it is still one of the leading causes of death within all ethnic and minority groups. Unfortunately, the more comorbidities that a person has, the higher the risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease or related dementias . ...
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Each month, we are able to highlight specific groups and/or illnesses that need more light to be shined upon them. For the month of June, one of those groups are those struggling with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, or PTSD. PTSD is not about the stressful situation that an individual has had to experience, but instead the after effect and shifts that has and continues to occur in their bodies even after the initial event has passed. Even though it may seem like our brains may forget traumatic events, our bodies certainly do not. We understand that chronic stress and trauma can lead to shifts in our bodies and DNA and can be passed down generationally ...
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What is LGBTQIA+? LGBTQIA+ is a shorthand way to reference a diverse community of people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or other. This acronym represents a broad range of identities and expressions of gender, sexual orientation, and presentation. LGBTQIA+ health disparities are preventable gaps in physical and mental health that stem from social stigma, discrimination, inequities, and denial of civil and human rights based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Amazingly, it is still legal to deny housing, employment and business services to people identifying as LGBTQIA+. No matter where they live, many LGBTQ ...
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If you’re like most mission-driven public health professionals, you give your best effort at work every day, your organization supports your development, and you’re given chances to learn and grow. [1] Whether you’re new to the field with no formal training in public or a seasoned practitioner with an advanced degree, professional development matters. Continuing to build knowledge and skills can help you succeed on the job, prepare for career advancement, and become a better leader. To help you identify specific areas for professional growth, the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD) has created the Chronic Disease Competencies Self-Assessment ...
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Now more than ever, it is crucial that we acknowledge the Indigenous People whose land we occupy. However, in order to be transformative, it is important to move away from “performative” acts, as Megan Red-Shirt Shaw in her essay “ Beyond the Land Acknowledgment; College “LAND BACK” or Free Tuition for Native Student ,” into a mindful way to show awareness, create accountability, and actively disrupt colonial structures. As public health professionals, we must use our expertise to elevate the health of Indigenous People. We can do this by: Establishing relationships with tribal entities, health councils and members Advocating for policies and legislation ...
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